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April 15th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

Central New York K-8 school librarians…sharpen your pencils. There’s money to be won.

Application deadline is 11:59 pm this Friday, April 18!

The Sara Jaffarian School Library Program Award is an annual award to a school library that has conducted an exemplary program or program series in the humanities (social studies, poetry, drama, art, music, language arts, foreign language, and culture) during the prior school year.

The award consists of (1) a $4,000 cash award; (2) a plaque; and (3) the promotion of the winner as a model program for other school libraries.

Past winners and their inspiring programs are listed on the award website.

bookweek

April 12th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

We were recently reminded at a CLRC First Monday event at the White Branch Library, about the important role our Central New York region plays in being a safe destination for immigrants from countries all over the world.

The Citizenship and Integration Direct Services Grant Program: Citizenship Instruction and Naturalization Application Services is accepting application from institutions that make available quality citizenship preparation services such as:
* instruction and naturalization application services
* developing, identifying, and sharing practices in citizenship preparation
* increasing the use of and access to technology in citizenship preparation programs
* working with local libraries, which serve as vital resources for immigrant communities
* engaging receiving communities in the citizenship and civic integration process

Those eligible to apply for the grant include:
* Independent school districts
* Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS
* Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
* Private institutions of higher education

Application deadline is May 16. Awards range from $50,000 to $250,000.

grants-gov-logo

April 9th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming-Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s Programming Inspiration is the result of a collaborative effort: the Great Minds / Great Ideas Lecture Series held at both Cazenovia Public Library and Manlius Public Library. The series is funded by a generous Cazenovia College benefactor (Doris Webster Eversfield); the lectures are given at the two public libraries throughout the year by Cazenovia College Professors.

This program yields some high quality adult programming; the professors are speaking about topics that they feel passionately about, and they are some of the most qualified people to do so. The fact that this is a series– that each library doesn’t have to scramble to negotiate and secure each presenter separately– means that the public can rely on a steady intervals of interesting and thought-provoking evenings.

Previous events have included lectures on determination & motivation; the history of vaccinations; Noam Chompsky’s political work; and a discussion of Man’s Search for Meaning. The event calendar is available here: http://www.cazenovia.edu/news-and-events/annual-events/great-minds-great-ideas-lecture-series

University/public library relationships are gaining in popularity, but are usually aimed at getting students access to public library materials. The college and library’s effort to give public library patrons  access to the university’s assets (faculty), in a structured way is novel (and inspiring!).

April 9th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

Disaster could hit the Central New York region at any time. Governor Cuomo is offering a training program for anyone interested in being prepared, just in case.

Local training will be held on April 12 from 10:00 am to noon at the Onondaga Community College campus

You Must Register in Advance: http://www.prepare.ny.gov/

Citizen PreparednessPreview

April 8th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) will be coming to CLRC later this month. The class is designed for public librarians and secondary school librarians, teachers, nurses, and counselors.

From A(norexia) to Z(its): Providing Health Information to Teens

April 24, 2014
9:00 am to noon
CLRC Training room, 6493 Ridings Road, Syracuse

REGISTER HERE

This hands-on class will present an overview of health information needs of teenagers and their information seeking behaviors; review communication skills needed during reference interviews with teenagers; and discuss credible health information resources that are designed for teens.

3 MLA CEs.

Presenter: Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

April 8th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

Are there any “smart” librarians in the CLRC region? Time to get recognized for those smarts.

NYLA’s SMART (Section on Management of Information Resources and Technology) is seeking nominations for their 2014 awards. All nominations are due July 15, 2014.

Ellen C. Rappaport Professional Achievement Award
The purpose of this award is to recognize the outstanding professional achievements of a current or former member of the Section on Management of Information Resources and Technology (SMART). A recipient shall have been a member of the Section for a minimum of three years and shall have made outstanding contributions in one or more of the following areas: acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, collection management, conservation/preservation, serials control, or automation. The recipient selected by the Section’s award committee will receive a plaque and award of $100 to be presented at the NYLA Annual Conference.

Submit your nomination using this online form:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Xor57042Uy18CtvwlOh7qaRftIiztax06Js0UiQ-qKc/viewform

*****
The Teresa Strozik Award for Innovation in Library Technology
Teresa Strozik exemplified leadership within the New York State library community through innovations in technical services. In 2009, the SMART Board created this award to honor Teresa and those who follow in her path.

This award recognizes a current NYLA member for the innovative use of technology in a library or information setting. The recipient of this award is one who embraces new and emerging technologies by incorporating them into their work and/or programs. For the purposes of this award, technology may be defined as traditional library technologies (cataloging, ILL, ILS, etc.) or other technologies (websites, communication tools, etc.). The recipient selected by the Section’s award committee will receive a plaque and award of $100 to be presented at the NYLA Annual Conference. The recipient will also be asked to give a brief overview of his or her technology innovation during the NYLA Annual Conference.

Submit your nomination using this online form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1LFaAzJKrv-RsZNvhs8-0eAyM0HuvahhMD65_BWHPaDY/viewform

*****
The NYLA Dewey Fellowship Award
The SMART section is one of three sections eligible this year for awarding the Dewey Fellowship Award to attend the NYLA Annual Conference in 2014. Dewey Fellows are chosen on a basis of the following criteria: 1) Five or more years of experience as a librarian, (MLS not required), 2) record of accomplishment in library profession, and 3) involvement in activities to advance the library community. The Dewey Fellowship pays for up to $1000 of the cost of attendance at the NYLA Annual Conference. Additionally, each Dewey Fellow will receive a $100 Gift Certificate for use at the NYLA Store, and will be acknowledged on NYLA’s website, at the Annual Conference and in the NYLA Bulletin.

Submit your nomination using this online form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1k2Xpp-gfIQBKXPDlc9HdjSNsEYNcwBCmNdObp1e_3qs/viewform

April 8th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

Do you have staff that is new to the NOVELNY databases? Would you like to refresh your own knowledge about New York newspapers, Common Core resources and more?

ProQuest has scheduled the following webinars in April:

eLibrary Elementary and NOVELNY
This one hour class covers the content, features and tips for using eLibrary Elementary as well as incorporating eLibrary Elementary into classroom curriculum. Learn how young readers can use the colorful graphical search interface to find answers they need from magazines, newspapers, books, transcripts, maps, images, audio/video files and web links that are safe and appropriate for elementary school studies. Your questions will be answered by an eLibrary Elementary training expert during this interactive session.
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 3:00 PM
REGISTER HERE

Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 3:00
REGISTER HERE



Gannett Newspapers for NY State NOVELNY
This one hour class on the Gannett Newspapers for NOVEL helps users find the news information that they need quickly, Learn how to navigate the new Proquest platform quickly to access top news stories from New York and around the world. Browse companies, products, individuals, obituaries and death notices to find ancestors, relatives and notable figures and more! Your questions will be answered by a Proquest training expert during this interactive session.
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 4:00 PM
REGISTER HERE

Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 4:00 PM
REGISTER HERE



Common Core and ProQuest Resources
This one hour class will focus on the new Common Core standards and how they align to Proquest. With an emphasis on informational text, these standards require a focus on reading literacy across the curriculum and an emphasis on critical thinking, persuasion and analysis. The inclusion of primary sources and reference material and the addition of complex text that extends beyond the textbook can be found in Proquest resources. We have included essential questions and editorially created essential pages to provide context for learning. Our general reference databases provide an integrated model of literacy, a variety of integrated tools like lexiles for reading differentiation, My Analysis, graphic notecards and much more will be covered.
Monday, April 14, 2014, 3:00 PM
REGISTER HERE

April 4th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

CLRC member libraries always have an eye out for available monies to enhance their programs and services. This opportunity just came into view.

The Gladys Brooks Foundation provides support to nonprofit organizations located in seventeen states including New York.

The Foundation focuses its grant making on libraries, educational institutions, hospitals and clinics in the targeted states.

Grant applications will be considered only for major expenditures, generally between $50,000 and $100,000. Funds are intended to be used for capital projects, including equipment or endowments.

The application must be postmarked by May 30, 2014. Visit the Foundation’s website to request the application materials online.

April 1st, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

better-world-books-logo


CLRC libraries have three days to leap at the opportunity to apply for the Better World Books LEAP grant. Deadline is April 4.

The Literacy and Education in Action Program (LEAP) funds literacy and educational non-profits and libraries for specific, high impact literacy projects.

Projects should address the literacy needs of underserved populations in your community. And we all know some of our communities could use the help.

BWB will fund the projects that have the “biggest bang for the buck.” $40,000 in funding is available; maximum grant amount per project is $15,000.

To see last year’s winners or to apply, go to: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/custom.aspx?f=leap-libraries

March 28th, 2014 - Posted in News, Resources by Deirdre

The New York State Board of Regents Advisory Council for Libraries (RAC) met on March 26. One of the agenda discussion items included Youth Services recommendations as to how public libraries can support anti-bullying efforts. The NYSED Dignity Act for All Students Task Force has posted the updated Dignity for All Students Act Resource and Promising Practices Guide as a comprehensive guidance document to help support such efforts.

Please feel free to share this guide with your colleagues across the region and beyond. It may also be downloaded here.

March 24th, 2014 - Posted in Continuing Education, Events, Resources by Deirdre

As we approach March and the final month of open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance marketplaces, there are many excellent resources to help CLRC member libraries, their patrons, and their partners remain informed about accessing new healthcare options. Please read on for information on upcoming webinars and new tools, and feel free to share this message with others.

Enroll America hosted a free, six-part webinar series, focused on effective outreach and enrollment strategies that can be implemented quickly and effectively in communities. All webinars were recorded and archived for those who may wish to review them on their own time.

Click here to learn more or to access the archives.

The Rural Assistance Center provides health and human services information for rural America. They have created a Health Insurance Outreach and Enrollment topic guide tailored to rural communities. This guide can be accessed here.

Are you aware of other resources that members of the library community would find interesting or useful to support patron understanding of the Affordable Care Act? Has your library developed new partnerships in response to this information need?

Please join the Health Happens in Libraries team for a webinar on Thursday, March 27 at 2 PM Eastern to discuss your library’s experience! Registration for this free webinar is available here.

Join the conversation on Twitter at #libs4health #cnylibs

This post has been excerpted and adapted from recent DLD and WebJunction emails.

March 12th, 2014 - Posted in News, Resources by Debby

New York State Librarian, Bernard A. Margolis, announced today the soft launch of DaybyDayNY (http://daybydayny.org/), an early literacy website designed to engage families and very young children in reading, learning and public libraries.

DaybyDayNY is an important component of Ready to Read at New York Libraries, a new statewide program from the New York State Library designed to help library staff further enhance and expand their early literacy services and programs.

DaybyDayNY is a virtual calendar with content that changes every day. This unique setup gives families with young children numerous daily activities and a story to read together. The story, provided each day by One More Story (http://www.onemorestory.com/), is in the form of an eBook that includes original music and sound effects, produced by former Sesame Street Music Director, Robby Merkin. In addition, the website includes monthly activities, storytelling and nursery rhyme videos, rhymes for young children, craft activities for children and their caregivers, a link to “Find Your Public Library,” a New York State map of museums with activities for young families, health information, and reading lists. The website is designed to help parents and caregivers increase their young child’s cognitive skills and have fun together at the same time.

We hope libraries and systems will promote the use of this website to all young families and caregivers. Information about linking from your library or system website to DaybyDayNY and promoting the website with community members and partners is available at (http://daybydayny.org/) and scroll to the bottom of the page to click on “Share This Site.”

 

The New York State Library thanks the South Carolina State Library for providing the web structure and expertise that allowed us to model DaybyDayNY after the DaybyDaySC website. Additional help was provided by the Library of Virginia and the Idaho Commission for Libraries, both of which have created their own DaybyDay websites. In addition, the expertise of the Public Library System Youth Services Consultants has been an invaluable resource in perfecting the site for use statewide.

 

DaybyDayNY is funded through the Federal Library Services and Technology Act, with funds awarded to the New York State Library by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services.

 

Questions about DaybyDayNY may be directed to Karen Balsen, Library Development Specialist, Division of Library Development, New York State Library at kbalsen@mail.nysed.gov or 518-486-2194.

February 28th, 2014 - Posted in DHP, Resources by Deirdre

Attention CLRC libraries, archives, and museums, the PAG program is one of the few grants out there which can help equip you with the supplies (boxes, folders, etc.) you need to process your collections.  For tips and information on how to apply for this grant, please contact Deirdre Joyce, CLRC Regional Archivist.



PRESERVATION ASSISTANCE GRANTS FOR SMALLER INSTITUTIONS

GUIDELINES NOW AVAILABLE!

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities’ Division of Preservation and Access has offered Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions for more than a decade. These grants help small and mid-sized cultural heritage institutions such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities improve their ability to preserve and care for their humanities collections. Awards of up to $6,000 support preservation related collection assessments, consultations, purchase of preservation supplies and equipment, training and workshops, and institutional and collaborative disaster and emergency planning. Preservation Assistance Grants also support assessments of digital collections and education and training in standards and best practices for digital preservation, and the care and handling of collections during digitization. NEH does not fund digitization or the development of digital programs in this grant category.

 

All applications to the NEH must be submitted through Grants.gov. See the application guidelines for details.

 

The 2014 guidelines for Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions are now available. You will also find sample project descriptions, sample narratives, and a list of frequently asked questions. The deadline for applications is May 1, 2014.

 

See our feature article and interactive map of PAG awards across the country, up on our Web site now.

 

Small and mid-sized institutions that have never received an NEH grant are encouraged to apply. This year, we have added a special encouragement for applications from presidentially designated institutions (Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and Universities), and from Native American tribes with significant humanities collections.

 

For more information, contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at 202-606-8570 and preservation@neh.gov.

February 27th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas, Resources by Deirdre

The following information was distributed by the Department of Library Development on behalf of the New York State Library at the request of the National Health Care Decisions Day NYS Coalition — a statewide organization working to promote advance care planning for all New Yorkers.  

CLRC members working with communities that could benefit from this information may consider some programming opportunities for the April 16 event.  If your library is or has created such a program, please let us know about it in the comments section below!




Advance Care Planning Information for Libraries
and
National Health Care Decisions Day — April 16

Patricia Bomba, MD, FACP, Chair
Patricia Spreitzer, Member

Benjamin Franklin recognized two matters in life are unavoidable: Death and Taxes. National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD) is observed annually on April 16th since 2008. The goal of NHDD is simple: “to inspire, educate and empower the public and providers about the importance of advance care planning.  This year NHDD is celebrating the 7th annual event nationally. The NHDD NYS Coalition invites libraries across New York to consider joining in this effort.

About Advance Care Planning

What would happen if you experienced a sudden illness that prevented you from making your own medical decisions? How would you ensure that you receive the kind of care that you wanted? Would your family or loved ones know enough about what you value and believe to feel comfortable about making decisions about your care?

Advance Care Planning (ACP) is a process of planning for future medical care in case you are unable to make your own medical decisions. Advance Care Planning assists you in preparing for a sudden unexpected illness, from which you expect to recover, as well as the dying process and ultimately death.

As public libraries across New York State are a long-standing, recognized and respected community resource, NHDD hopes to engage libraries in the effort to achieve the following goal:

To create a sustainable, statewide, community-based effort to promote awareness of advance care planning year-round and link with resources on Advance Care Planning that contain accurate and current information, which is easily accessible and available to all community members.

Libraries can begin by learning more about NHDD using the following resources:

Libraries can provide links to resources for NY residents for dealing with Advance Care Planning

Libraries can maintain a copy of the following available advance care planning resources for public use:

  • Community Conversations on Compassionate Care (CCCC) Program, an award-winning program that combines storytelling with “Five Easy Steps” to promote conversations that help you complete your Health Care Proxy and Living Will.
  • Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) Program, designed to improve the quality of care which seriously ill people receive at the end of life. It is based on effective communication of patient wishes, and provides documentation of medical orders on a brightly colored pink form . Health care professionals will honor these wishes. MOLST is generally for persons with serious health conditions and the physician would not be surprised if the individual died within the next year.

Libraries can participate in NHDD activities:

  • Include information on NHDD in your newsletter or other usual means of communication
  • Twitter – Follow @PatBombaMD and @KatieGOrem to receive and retweet information about NHDD
  • Facebook – Like the Compassion and Support page
  • YouTube – Link to the Compassion and Support YouTube Channel to share videos featuring real stories from New Yorkers
  • Contact NHDD NYS Coalition for volunteers who are available to staff an information table or provide facilitation for a community education program on advance care planning.  (See a list of trainers on the Online Trainers Regional Map.)

Finally, Dr. Bomba, Chair of NHDD NYS Coalition and MOLST Statewide Implementation Team has offered to host a free webinar to explain, answer questions, and entertain suggestions pertaining to NHDD, the CCCC and MOLST programs.

 

About NHDD NYS Coalition

The NHDD NYS Coalition has been working diligently over the past 7 years to:

  • promote community awareness of the Advance Care Planning process
  • encourage individuals to choose a health care agent they trust to make medical decisions, based on what’s important to them, in the event they lose the ability to decide
  • talk to their health care agent, doctor, spiritual advisor, family and close friends about what is important, their personal goals for care and wishes concerning medical treatment.
  • complete a health care proxy
  • increase awareness of New York’s Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) and who should discuss MOLST with their physician

For more information: Visit NHDD.org or contact Dr. Patricia Bomba at Patricia.Bomba@lifethc.com

Note: the original announcement has been edited for length and clarity 

February 21st, 2014 - Posted in Continuing Education, Events, Resources by Deirdre

CNY libraries can take advantage of this FREE offering from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the second in the series.  For information about the first in this series, see our February 5 blogpost.


Second Webinar in USCIS-IMLS Series for Public Librarians Scheduled for March 6

USCIS representatives to discuss education resources, citizenship activities for libraries, and more

Washington, DC—The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) continue their series of free webinars for public libraries about immigration and U.S. citizenship topics with a second webinar on March 6.

The USCIS Citizenship Education and Initiatives presentation will build on many of the topics discussed in the first USCIS-IMLS webinar held on February 4, 2014. Specifically, this webinar will highlight USCIS educational resources related to citizenship and the naturalization process, as well as information on how libraries can actively engage in citizenship-related activities and events.

The webinar will also review USCIS resources designed to protect individuals from immigration services scams and discuss the types of assistance librarians can provide to immigrant patrons. It is not necessary to have participated in the first USCIS-IMLS webinar to participate in this session.

Webinar: USCIS Citizenship Education and Initiatives

Date and Time: Thursday, March 6, from 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. EST.

Registration: Register by March 4thTo register, follow this link for the USCIS Public Engagement Division email alert service, and enter your email address. Once you have entered your email, click on the “Subscriber Preferences” tab and then select “Event Registration.” Please provide the additional requested information to complete your registration. You will receive the URL for the webinar and the conference phone line information from USCIS shortly after you register.

This series was developed as part of a partnership between IMLS and USCIS to ensure that librarians have the necessary tools and knowledge to refer their patrons to accurate and reliable sources of information on immigration-related topics. To find out more about the partnership, the webinar series, and archived webinar recordings and transcripts, visit the Serving New Americans page of the IMLS website.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services 
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the government agency that oversees lawful immigration to the United States. For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visitwww.uscis.gov or follow us on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blogThe Beacon.

February 20th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming-Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s Programming Inspiration is an upcoming workshop at Skaneateles Library. The workshop is centered on a new resource that the library purchased: the library edition of the popular Ancestry.com. Used by novice and experienced genealogists alike, the resource combines a sharing/forum platform with multiple genealogical databases for users to search through.

The program is a smart one: the library has invested in a popular resource, and is showcasing the resources by holding a workshop for patrons. So why a workshop? There are certainly other ways of going about this: there are online tutorials, and librarians can certainly educate patrons one-on-one on using Ancestry’s databases. Workshops eliminate the duplicated effort of one-on-one instruction, but there is an additional layer of benefit to group learning that’s particular to the resource. It’s very likely that the people attending the workshop will have roots in the community to some extent, and therefore the first steps of this research will look very similar for a lot of Skaneateles’ patrons. The potential for sharing, learning, and connecting with each other during the workshop is encouragingly high!

This program also has the ability to give patrons the itch for genealogical research; a group that is notoriously ardent and ravenous in their search. Once their feet are wet in Ancestry’s databases, they’ll become users of local history resources in the library and beyond. Fantastic program!

February 12th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming-Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s Programming Inspiration comes to us from the Fayetteville Free Library (FFL): their Downton Abbey Season Finale Party on 2/21. In the past decade or so, events that capitalize on the excitement and fanaticism for book series have become pretty common– libraries holding release parties, trivia games, and themed festivities are a fun outlet for fans to gather around. But what’s less common is a party for a TV show.

FFL pounced on the unique opportunity that Downton Abbey presents; the show has already been aired to a British audience, and therefore the episodes are all available. FFL has secured a copy of the finale episode, and will be giving participants a chance to watch the show TWO DAYS before it airs on PBS. In addition to this, the library is holding trivia games, costume contests, and they’ll have a green screen so that people can have pictures taken against Downton Abbey backdrops!

This program takes the idea of the book release/themed parties a bit further to create an even more shared experience; because that’s what these parties are about, aren’t they? Sharing excitement and love for a story with other like-minded individuals. This program takes that sharing past the point that the book parties are capable of — because at the end of the night everyone goes home (or at least off to a corner) to read alone. The people attending the Downton Abbey Finale party will get to experience the next chapter of their story together, and talk about it afterwards the very same night instead of hours/days/weeks later.

While this situation might not be entirely replaceable (how often is there a cult following for for TV shows that have a delayed release in the US?), it’s a great program to dissect and take away more ideas for fandom programming– how can we create more shared experiences for people who are already excited? How can we facilitate this community getting together and having fun? Watching the show together could only augment the sense of community that swells around fandom events, and that’s a very inspiring thing!

February 5th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming-Inspiration

 

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

Necessities for winter weather: a good book; a warm drink; and a  furry, cuddly best friend. Northern Onondaga Public Library (NOPL) seems to know that these are the ingredients to enjoying a snowy day. That’s why this is their 11th year partnering with the CNY SPCA to gather donations and find homes for these adoptable friends.

Last weekend, NOPL held an hour-long Meet & Greet with SPCA staff which capped a month-long donation drive. For the event, NOPL’s community room was lined with photos of adoptable pets, and one lucky dog from the SPCA was even in attendance. Patrons could come meet the dog and ask SPCA staff about the adoption process and volunteering opportunities.  Programs like this can be tricky and unpredictable; anything involving animals has to have some careful planning and thought. NOPL was smart with their approach for multiple reasons:

  • People could get an idea of how many pets are in need of help without having them all in the building; by just having one well behaved dog in the community room, people could get a taste of the really enjoyable part of adopting or volunteering– having an animal show you a little love, and giving some back. The scope of how many pets are in need was well represented by the pictures in the room
  • For those without the time, ability, or room to adopt or volunteer right now also had  an outlet to help; the library was accepting donations of food, toys, and other items leading up to the event
  • For some, removing the adoption process from the SPCA shelter can alleviate indecision and hesitation. Some people aren’t sure whether they’re truly ready for the responsibility and stay away from shelters, fearing that they’ll fall in love and make a rash decision. Giving them the opportunity to make a little more objective of a decision with a picture gives potential adopters the room to carefully and responsibly approach the topic.

This is a great collaborative program that’s a positive for every party involved; inspiring!

 

 

January 29th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

pulling-hair-out_0

Are you pulling your hair because of the new WorldShare Interlibrary Loan? OCLC is offering a free webinar in February to ease your transition.

Who’s Using WorldShare ILL Now? Practical Advice from Real Users
February 13, 2014
12:30 pm
Register

In this program, WorldShare ILL users will share practical advice about how they managed their transitions to the new service. Presenters are:
· Christopher Richardson, Director of Library Service, and Paige Hiatt, Circulation Specialist, from Southern Virginia University
· Leslie Starasta, Information Services Librarian, from Lincoln Christian University

 

WorldShare Interlibrary Loan Update and Chat with the OCLC Team
Date TBA
Register

Learn about new WorldShare ILL features released in February. These features include Article Exchange preview, customized book straps and more. This program will also include an overview of planned enhancements to the service and time to chat with members of the WorldShare ILL team.

 

WorldShare Interlibrary Loan Dates to Remember:
· April 14, 2014: New requests can no longer be placed in WorldCat Resource Sharing
· May 19, 2014: End of access to WorldCat Resource Sharing

Stay Informed:
· Details about WorldShare ILL are available at http://oc.lc/ill.
· WorldShare ILL Support and Training resources are provided at http://oc.lc/illtraining.

January 29th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming-Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s programming inspiration is from Cazenovia Public Library. Their program More Than a Box is based on a children’s book, Not a Box by Antoinette Portis, and is centered on the transformation of a box into something else.

For the program, the library provides basic art supplies. The kids (K-4) and their families then work to transform the box into whatever their imaginations could come up with. This is a great program because it includes elements of:

  • Teamwork: not only important in general, but especially important for families to communicate effectively and work together towards a goal
  • Creativity: this program not only had the kids imagine possibilities, but give them the tools and space to make the concept reality. The bridge between ideas and actions can sometimes seem insurmountable, but this project begins with the premise that the bridge will be crossed.
  • Audience: this program is better just by virtue of it being in the library. After crafting the boxes into something new, there are people there to appreciate and congratulate the participants on their creations. Kids can also come away with a concept of how unique their idea was after seeing how different the other projects turned out.

Check out the pictures from the event on Cazenovia Public Library’s Facebook page here!

January 29th, 2014 - Posted in DHP, Resources by Deirdre

The New York State Archives has announced its Documentary Heritage Program (DHP) grants for 2014-2015.

To assist in your understanding of the new guidelines, CLRC has created the below Grant Primer to give constituents a quick overview of the new requirements.


For additional information, please consult the DHP Grant Guidelines and Application for 2014-2015 which are available on the New York State Archives website.

Reminder: The postmark deadline is Monday, March 3, 2014 for projects to be carried out from July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

January 29th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

Proposal Writing for Outreach Projects for Public Libraries
Presenter: Kate Flewelling, Outreach Coordinator NN/LM MAR
Details: http://nnlm.gov/training/schedule/class_details.html?class_id=653

Wednesday, February 5, 2014
11 am – 12:30 pm

Summary: This session designed specifically for public library staff will provide an overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal. Registration priority will be given to NN/LM members in NY, NJ, PA and DE.



Grants and Proposal Writing
Presenter: Kate Flewelling, Outreach Coordinator, NN/LM MAR
Register: http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=511

Three required webinars:
Thursday, 2/6: Common Mistakes and Finding Funding
Thursday, 2/13: The Proposal
Thursday, 2/20: The Budget and Finishing Touches
10:00 – 11:00am all three days

Summary: Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal. Each component of the grant writing process will be addressed, including: documenting the need; identifying the target population; writing measurable objectives; developing a work plan, an evaluation plan and dissemination plan.

The course will consist of three 1 hour Adobe Connect webinars and a planning assignment. Participants who complete all requirements will be eligible for 4 MLA CE.

January 24th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Anna

Libraries throughout the Central New York region provide services to our Native American neighbors. This grant offers an opportunity to expand on those services.

flag-of-five-nations                         download

The Native American Library Services Basic Grants program, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), provides provides noncompetitive multi-year grants of approximately $6,000- $7,000 to federally recognized tribes to support core library services, such as buying library materials, funding salaries and training, and providing Internet connectivity and computers.

Enhancement grants, of up to $150,000 with terms of up to two years, are available to tribes with basic grants for expanding services for learning, access to information, and partnerships.

Learn more online at the FY14 Native American Library Services webpages for basic grants applicants and enhancement grants applicants.

The application deadline is March 3, 2014.

January 17th, 2014 - Posted in Resources by Claire

Have some materials that are falling apart?  The New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials provides $500,000 each year for preserving materials in the collection of libraries, archives, historical societies and similar agencies.  The grant awards for 2014-15 will be limited to a minimum of $2,500 and a maximum of $40,000.

Grant applications must be received by 5 pm March 31, 2014.

To see the full requirements and information about the grant, log in to https://eservices.nysed.gov/ldgrants with your NYS gov ID (make one here: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/cp/index.html)

Your organization must also prequalify in the Grants Gateway: http://grantsreform.ny.gov/grantees before applying.

January 16th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s Programming Inspiration comes from Sullivan Free Library. This is a library that has been blessed with an abundance of space, and they’re making the most it  for the community by getting everyone moving! Using some DVDs from the library’s collection, the Library holds group Yoga classes on Monday’s & Fridays at the Chittenango location.

This is a great program because:

  • It encourages a healthier community.
  • It offers the community a low cost option for fitness, without having to do these exercises alone at home.
  • Yoga is great for a huge age range because moves can be modified and the exercise is low impact
  • People can meet, mingle, and make exercise buddies, which goes a long way to keeping with a program and on track with fitness goals.

Thanks for the inspiration this week, Sullivan Free Library!

January 16th, 2014 - Posted in Events, News, Resources by Anna

fizz-boom-read-main

Get those creative bubbles fizzing!

It’s never too early to think about summer sunshine in the middle of a central New York winter. And it’s never too early for libraries to think about their summer reading programs for children & teens.

Go to the State website for dynamite information and program ideas. http://www.summerreadingnys.org/

January 14th, 2014 - Posted in News, Resources by Deirdre
Grolier Online is now available statewide via geolocation.  No username or password will be required as long as the user is located in New York State.
Please see http://galesupport.com/novelny for the geolinks for the Scholastic, ProQuest and Gale databases.  Choose “Direct Database URLs” and enter your library’s Gale location ID.  The Scholastic and ProQuest databases will be listed at the bottom under “Non-Gale Databases.”  If you do not see links for your library for either ProQuest or Scholastic please use the contact information on the support page to contact the appropriate vendor.

Please update your Scholastic, Gale and ProQuest links to the new geolinks on the page above so that your patrons will not need to use usernames/passwords, library cards or driver licenses.  If you update the links and geolocation is not working please contact Gale atGale.Consortium.Installs@cengage.com.

For other access questions please contact the NOVELNY Help Desk at nyslnovel@mail.nysed.gov or 1-877-277-0250 (518-486-6012 local).


This message was originally sent from the Department of Library Development to NYLINE on 1/14/2013.




novel

January 13th, 2014 - Posted in Events, News, Resources by Deirdre
Along with the other councils in the NY 3Rs Association, Inc, CLRC is pleased to offer a reduced rate for the Computers in Libraries (CIL) conference, April 7-9, 2014, at the Hilton Washington, Washington DC. By registering through the Association, you will be eligible for the special rate of $299.00 for the 3-day event (if you register before March 7th). That is a 40% savings off the regular conference registration cost of $499.00!  You can visit the Computers in Libraries 2014 conference page for full conference program information.


To receive the discounts, go to the the NY 3Rs Association, Inc. to sign up to receive the discount code. No discounts are available for any pre- or post-conference workshops, nor are discounts available on daily rates.

January 9th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

If you aren’t familiar with some of the NOVELNY databases available to your patrons, Gale has scheduled the following webinars for the month of January.

novel

*Business Insights: Essentials
Business Insights: Essentials, formerly Business & Company Resource Center, is an online resource that provides in-depth information about U.S. and international businesses and industries for students, researchers, and business professionals in the academic and public library markets. This acclaimed resource brings together a wide variety of business information in one place, enabling libraries to more effectively help staff and patrons investigate investment opportunities; research business case studies and find parent-subsidiary relationships; explore market and industry information and analysis; study product and brand information; compare companies within an industry; target new customers and inform on potential business opportunities, distribution channels and licensing opportunities; and so much more.
In this training, we will explore the new interface and empower you to easily research different companies, access industry rankings and profiles, access SWOT reports and other financial analysis, and explore the new tools available for the articles within Business Insights: Essentials.
January 13, 10-11am
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=920584847

January 22, 1-2pm
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=926967771

January 30, 10-11am
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=922174994



*Opposing Viewpoints in Context
Now an even more dynamic resource with a new interface and enhanced functionality, this online social issues resource is designed to meet the needs of public, school and academic libraries. Gale Opposing Viewpoints draws on the acclaimed social issues series published by Greenhaven Press, as well as core reference content from other Gale and Macmillan Reference USA sources, including selections from Bioethics for Students. The result is a dynamic online library of current event topics – the facts, as well as the arguments – of each topic’s proponents and detractors. Gale Opposing Viewpoint’s unique features include Topic Overviews – frameworks that allow students to explore each topic’s many facets – and exclusive electronic access to Gale’s Information Plus reference series of statistics, government data, information on legislation and more. The Critical Thinking version supplements the acclaimed Gale Opposing Viewpoints with additional content and features that are curriculum focused. Learn how you can easily integrate 21st Century Skills into your instruction with this proven approach to learning.
January 14, 1-2pm
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=926865361



*Kids InfoBits
Kids InfoBits is an exciting resource designed especially for students in kindergarten through grade five. Complete with an engaging, developmentally appropriate graphic interface, premier reference content and the best magazines for elementary students, Kids InfoBits addresses the way kids learn and conduct research — and makes it fun!
January 15, 1:30-2:30pm
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=927886486

January 31, 10-11am
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=920677805



*Gale Usage Portal
The Gale Usage portal provides customers with fast, flexible access to usage statistics for their Gale database subscriptions. This site will give you the ability to create customized reports and save them for future use. In this web training, we will introduce this new tool and show you what type of reports are available to gather usage statistics on your Gale products. We will explore how to run reports immediately and schedule reports to be sent on a reoccurring basis. We will also cover how to manage the reports that you have schedule using the My Activities and schedules link.
January 16, 10-11am
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=927812165



*Gale Admin Tool
The Gale Admin Tool is the new tool used to configure your Gale resources. This new tool will provide library administrators a web-based set of tools to support Gale subscription-based products. During this session you will get acquainted with the new administrator tool. Participants will learn how to manage patron access to the subscribed products via various authentication methods, customize product preferences, set up third-party links, configure custom database collections, manage eBook collections, and view usage reports. All participants joining the session should have administrative rights to customize their institutions resources.
January 23, 2-3pm
Register at https://cengage.webex.com/cengage/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=924773829



Provided by the New York State Library, NOVELNY is a Statewide Internet Library connecting New Yorkers to 21st century information. NOVELNY is supported with temporary federal Library Services and Technology Act funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

January 8th, 2014 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming Inspiration

 

Programming Inspiration is a weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

This week’s programming inspiration comes from the Petit Branch Library of OCPL. This month, on January 10th, the library is holding an Online Travel Planning event. Per the library’s newsletter, in the the event participants will:

Learn how to find out the best travel deals out there, as well as how to book tickets for air, cruise, bus or train travel. Car rental, overseas insurance and last minute deals are also covered. Basic computer knowledge and a working email account are required. Each participant will have a computer to work on and laptops are welcome.

This program has the potential to unite a unique and varied group under one activity; novice travelers who may have little to a lot of computer knowledge, and novice online consumers who may have little to a lot of travel know-how. This program brings the group together over a fun topic, and helps patrons use technology to pursue their interests intelligently and with confidence.

Good luck with the program, Petit!

January 7th, 2014 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

Important info session for all PubMed users…

Join National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) trainers for a one-hour PubMed update session. Learn about recently added PubMed features and interface changes from the last six months.

No cost and no registration needed!
January 8, 2014
12:00 to 1:00 pm

Adobe Connect https://webmeeting.nih.gov/marpubmed/

Bring your questions!

January 6th, 2014 - Posted in 3Rs Association, Inc., Digitization, Events, News by Claire

On January 17th, the NY 3Rs Association, Inc. (of which CLRC is a member) will sponsor another presentation of the webinar, Digital Public Library of America: What does it mean for libraries?.  Following Amy Rudersdorf’s informational presentation about the DPLA, Jason Kucsma of the Metropolitan Library Council will answer any questions you have about New York’s new service hub, the Empire State Digital Network, which will be administered through the METRO and the NY 3Rs Association, Inc.

The DPLA Service Hubs are state or regional digital libraries that aggregate information about digital objects from libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions within their given state or region. Each Service Hub offers its state or regional partners a full menu of standardized digital services, including digitization, metadata, data aggregation and storage services, as well as locally hosted community outreach programs, bringing users in contact with digital content of local relevance.

You can watch a recording of Amy’s December 12th, 2013 presentation here: http://www.scrlc.org/data/12-12-2013_DPLA.mp4

To read more about the Empire State Digital Network and its progress, please visit http://www.ny3rs.org/projects/empire-state-digital-network/

January 6th, 2014 - Posted in News, Resources by Deirdre

New York State has implemented a new statewide prequalification requirement for not-for-profits applying for grants. In order to be eligible to apply, all New York State grant applicants are required to prequalify using the New York State Grants Gateway. The pre-qualification registration process requests information about organization’s capacity, legal compliance, and integrity. This process may take up to a few weeks to complete.

January 6th, 2014 - Posted in News, Resources by Anna

News for all CNY Libraries…

Bernard A. Margolis, Assistant Commissioner for Libraries and State Librarian, recently announced the preliminary selection of e-resources for NOVELNY’s collection beginning July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.

The databases listed below will be freely available to over 5,600 public, school, academic and special libraries currently registered for NOVELNY and to individuals who are residents of New York State that visit http://www.novelnewyork.org.

If your library is not registered please see the For Librarians link on the website or contact the NOVELNY Help Desk toll-free at 877-277-0250.

The databases will be available through geoIP authentication (also referred to as geolocation). Geolocation is a method to allow or disallow a user access to a database based on his/her geographic location as determined from their IP address. If a patron is accessing the databases through a library website or the NOVELNY portal while in New York he/she will be able to enter the database without entering a username/password, library card number or a driver license number.

BUSINESS
*Business Insights: Essentials (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains over 3,900 magazines and journals, nearly 25,000 industry reports, nearly 11,000 company histories and nearly 500,000 company profiles.

ELEMENTARY LEVEL GENERAL PERIODICALS
*eLibrary Elementary (ProQuest): Contains over 140 magazines and books for elementary students. Also includes the American Heritage Dictionary.
*Kids InfoBits (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains over 100 age-appropriate magazines for grades K-5. Also includes Merriam-Webster’s Elementary Dictionary, maps, flags, seals, charts and graphs.

ENCYCLOPEDIA
*Encyclopedia Americana (Scholastic): Articles include links to further readings, a bibliography, selected full text articles, web page links, and links to related articles. Includes maps, flags, tables and illustrations.
*The New Book of Knowledge (Scholastic): Resource for middle grade students that includes literary selections, a timeline, projects and experiments, news, homework help and more.
*Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia (Scholastic): Resource for upper middle school students through adults that includes encyclopedia articles, news, timelines, quizzes and games, and research starters. It also includes an atlas and dictionary. Articles can be grouped by lexile level and are aligned to standards.
*La Nueva Enciclopedia Cumbre (Scholastic): Spanish language encyclopedia written from a Latin American perspective. Includes timelines, maps and an events calendar.
*Amazing Animals of the World (Scholastic): Resource for elementary school students that includes facts and photos for over 1,200 animals.
*The New Book of Popular Science (Scholastic): Resource for middle and high school students that includes articles in the areas of science, technology and medicine. Also includes photos, maps and technical illustrations.
*America the Beautiful (Scholastic): Resource for elementary and middle school students that includes articles on US cities, states and Presidents.
*Lands and Peoples (Scholastic): Resource for middle and high school students that includes articles on countries, cultures and current events. It also includes an atlas and almanacs.

GENERAL PERIODICALS
*Academic OneFile (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains over 13,000 peer-reviewed journals covering a wide variety of subjects. Full text is available for over 6,000 journals.
*General OneFile (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains over 13,000 popular magazines and periodicals covering a wide variety of subjects. Full text is available for over 6,000 magazines and periodicals.

HEALTH
*Health Reference Center Academic (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains almost 3,000 magazines and journals covering medicine, health and nursing, over 2,500 topical overviews, and videos of medical procedures.

ISSUES
*Opposing Viewpoints in Context (Gale Cengage Learning): This database, which develops research skills and promotes issue awareness, information literacy and critical thinking, will support the new Common Core Curriculum Standards adopted by New York State. It contains a range of perspectives on many important issues, with over 13,000 pro/con viewpoints. Students of all levels will benefit from a variety of resource types: reference, news, primary sources, multimedia and more.

NEWSPAPERS
*Gannett Newsstand Complete (ProQuest): Contains over 85 Gannett newspapers, 6 of which are New York newspapers. These include the Ithaca Journal, Poughkeepsie Journal, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Journal News (White Plains), Press and Sun-Bulletin (Binghamton) and Star-Gazette (Elmira).
*InfoTrac Newsstand (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains over 1,100 newspapers, 33 of which are New York State newspapers.
*National Newspaper Index (Gale Cengage Learning): Contains indexing of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, Los Angeles Times, USA Today and The Washington Post.
*New York State Newspapers (Gale Cengage Learning): Subset of InfoTrac Newsstand which contains 33 New York State newspapers, including the Albany Times Union, New York Times, Newsday, Buffalo News, Post-Standard (Syracuse), Watertown Daily Times, Times Herald-Record (Middletown) and others.

Please note: the New York State Education Department’s EngageNY website, which includes information on New York State’s P-12 Common Core Learning Standards, is also linked from the NOVELNY website.

Provided by the New York State Library, NOVELNY is a Statewide Internet Library connecting New Yorkers to 21st Century information. NOVELNY is supported with temporary federal Library Services and Technology Act funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

December 20th, 2013 - Posted in Resources by Anna

youth award

The National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards is sponsored by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. The program recognizes excellence in after-school and out-of-school arts and humanities programs for underserved children and youth. The programs run on weekends, afternoons, and summer vacations, providing a safe space for young people.

Twelve winners will receive a $10,000 award and an invitation to accept their award at a White House ceremony.

Programs initiated by museums, libraries, schools and universities are encouraged to apply. Kudos to all of our CLRC member libraries that provide artsy after-school opportunities for the children in their communities.  Why not apply and get recognized at the White House?

Application deadline is February 10. Visit the program’s website to submit an online application.

December 20th, 2013 - Posted in News, Resources by Anna

Libraries in the CLRC region take heed of this great opportunity.

A letter from SU iSchool’s Jill Hurst-Wahl…

Dear Upstate NY Library Professional,

I am seeking projects for the spring semester of IST 613 – Planning, Marketing and Assessing Library Services – at the SU iSchool. Student teams need to work with area libraries during the spring semester to develop plans for new library projects, products or services.

What do the students do? The students research how other organizations have planned, marketed and assessed projects similar to yours and produce a literature review. Then they create a project plan for your endeavor, taking into account what they have learned about your organization (e.g., staffing, etc.). After the project plan is complete, they work on a marketing plan and finally an assessment plan. Each document is reviewed by the professor and modified based on the professor’s input and additional information gathered by the students. The format of the documents follows the format outlined in the syllabus, which may include more information than you would require, and ensures that the students have thoroughly considered the details.

Note that the students are required to do all of the documents in the paragraph above. They cannot just do a marketing plan, for example.

What don’t they do? It is important to note that the students do not implement the project. They are responsible for developing the plans for the project. Some of the students may be available to help with implementing the project afterward as part of an internship.

What will your library receive? At the end of the semester, you will receive a project plan, marketing plan, assessment plan and literature review for your project. This material is then yours to implement as-is or tweak to further meet your needs. Some libraries have used these plans in order to obtain funding from the library’s board of directors or other sources.

What would be your time commitment? During the first four weeks of the semester (Jan. 16-Feb. 14), you – or your appropriate staff member – would need to spend approximately one hour with the student team, at your facility, discussing your project idea. (Each team will contain 2-4 students.) At this meeting, you would need to tell them what you have in mind and any parameters that they should be aware of. After that, the students may need to contact you by phone or email to ask any clarifying questions. At the end of the semester, you would need to attend the last class on Thursday, April 24 (5-7:50 p.m.), where every student team will present a poster on their semester-long projects. At that time, you would receive the plans that the students have developed for you.

While you may want to review all of the plans in-depth during the semester, it is not part of the commitment that I am seeking from you. In other words, I want the impact on you to be fairly low during the semester.

With all of that in mind, my estimate is that the time commitment — including coming to class — would be approximately 7-10 hours.

What services have students developed plans for in the past? Some services that students have developed plans for include:

Human library
Circulating bake ware collection
Institutional repository
Bicycle lending program
Little Free Libraries
Summer reading programs
Gaming programs – for youth or intergenerational groups
Information commons
Book clubs for adults, students, and pre-K children
Outreach & orientations
Library art programs
Computer recycling program
Library fundraising event
Music events in the library (coffeehouse)

What projects you might want them to work on is only bounded by your imagination.

You have an idea! What do you do next? Please email the following information to jahurst@syr.edu:

Name of your library
Address of your library
5-6 sentence description of the project. What do you envision the end result of the project being? What are you trying to achieve?
Name, phone number and email address of the person on staff who will be able to answer specific questions about the project

Please note that I will only accept a maximum of two (2) ideas from your library. If you have more than two ideas, please send me the ones where you believe you will benefit the most from the students’ work. (Overall, I anticipate that 12-15 project ideas will be worked on by the students during the semester.)

If you’re unsure if your project would be a good one for our students, then let’s find time to talk about your idea and see if it would work.

We’re looking for projects from public, school, academic and special libraries, as well as library consortia. After the class starts on January 16, students will review the projects ideas and select the projects they want to work on. Once the selection process is complete, I’ll let you know who has selected your project. If your project is not selected, I’ll try to connect you with an intern.

I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks in advance for your help!

Regards,

Jill

Jill Hurst-Wahl | School of Information Studies
Associate Professor of Practice
Director, M.S. Library and Info. Science &
LIS with School Media Specialization Programs

Syracuse University
208 Hinds Hall
Syracuse, New York 13244
t 315.443.1070 e jahurst@syr.edu

 

December 18th, 2013 - Posted in Programming Ideas by Stephanie

Programming Inspiration

Programming Inspiration is a new weekly post to highlight, share, discuss, and build on the program ideas floating around in the CLRC region. This idea-sharing initiative originated with Hamilton Public Library Director Hilary Virgil along with a group of librarians who made a point of touring other libraries in the region. They came away inspired both about new programming ideas and reaching out to share these new ideas with their colleagues.

If your library has a unique program to share, or if you have an idea that’s been kicking around in your head, let us know about it and we’ll showcase your idea! Discussion about the programs in the comments section below is highly encouraged.

 

This week’s inspired programming idea comes from Liverpool Public Library. The idea is simple, but within it is some values and commitments by the library that are implicit in the programming. The program is Pajama Storytime: it’s a once-a-month event held in the evening where kids (aged 2-5 with a caregiver) come in their pajamas and bring stuffed animals, friends, and blankets to come hear a story before bedtime.

 

So what’s the significance of this program? Well, it’s obviously unique; it takes the very traditional idea of storytime and gives it a hook– come dressed up! Be prepared to get sleepy! But the true genius of the program is what the advertisements don’t say. What they don’t say is:

 

- Our community has parents and caregivers that keep non-traditional/irregular/hectic schedules, and the morning storytime might not fit their needs; we want to meet them at that point of need

- Storytime programs play such a key role in kids’ interest in reading, socialization, and literacy development that the programming needs to reach as many children as possible. The library is willing to re-work programming and schedules that make that happen for the community

By letting a patron-centric viewpoint guide their programming, Liverpool has developed an idea worth noting!

December 18th, 2013 - Posted in Resources by Anna

How do we deliver electronic materials to library users more quickly, regardless of where they start their online information search?

OCLC has published a report including case studies and findings from their E-Resource Advisory Council exploring the challenges of managing e-resources.

e-resources_cover_thumbnail

Download a copy of the white paper.

December 17th, 2013 - Posted in Resources by Anna

It’s Christmas time and CLRC member libraries are at the top of their technology tree. But, there’s that one branch…

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Mid-Atlantic Region has funding available for a technology improvement award. The recipient must be able to purchase and implement the technology by April 30, 2014.

Description and application: http://nnlm.gov/mar/funding/tech_improvement2013.html

Applications are being accepted until January 21, 2014.

See past MAR technology funding projects:
· MAR Funded 2013 – 2014

· MAR Funded 2012 – 2013

· MAR Funded 2011 – 2012

NNLMMAR log

December 6th, 2013 - Posted in Resources by Anna

The 2014 RBDB mini-grant application process has opened, with all applications due to CLRC by January 17, 2014.

Applications are invited in three areas:
* Retrospective Conversion
* Digitization
* Metadata

Instructions and application forms are available on the CLRC website at http://clrc.org/grants-sponsored-programs/rbdb/. Grant recipients will be notified of their awards following the March 2014 CLRC Board of Trustees Meeting.

Depending on the number of applications received and the amounts of funding requested, CLRC may not be able to fund all applications and/or may offer partial funding. There is an area on the application form where you can indicate your willingness to accept partial funding. Projects over $10,000 will typically not be fully funded. All projects meeting the state RBDB guidelines will be considered. Preference will be given to projects related to materials of regional interest.

CLRC is happy to be able to encourage and support new initiatives in our member libraries. We hope you will take advantage of the member grants!

If you have any questions, please contact Debby Emerson or call 315-446-5446.

December 5th, 2013 - Posted in News, Resources by Anna

Central New York communities read in a BIG way! So why not consider a community-wide reading event in yours?

The Big Read program supports organizations across the country in developing community-wide programs which encourage reading and participation by diverse audiences.

download

Eligible applicants include organizations such as literary centers, libraries, museums, colleges and universities, art centers, historical societies, arts councils, tribal governments, humanities councils, literary festivals, and arts organizations. Unfortunately, K-12 and school districts are not eligible but partnering is encouraged.

Applications are now being accepted. Seventy-five communities will be chosen for the September 2014 through June 2015 reading period. See the book catalog for reading choices.

Click here for more information on the application process.

CLRC challenge: let’s try to get everyone in our four-county region to get out there and read!

December 2nd, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

In this series on productivity, lynda.com contributor and author Jess Stratton takes you through the latest tools that will help you run your business and life more efficiently. (more…)

December 2nd, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

CLRC offers its member constituents (including members of our five participating library systems and individual members) access to the entire lynda.com training library at no charge. For more information on how to request an access code, please click here.

iBooks Author is a powerful page-layout application that allows you to integrate text, photos, slideshows, video, audio, and even quizzes into your books. In this course Joseph Linaschke shows you around, starting with basics like adding photos and video, flowing text around objects, inserting new chapters, and previewing your creation on an iPad. Then you’ll learn how to customize layouts, use master objects, add slideshows and quizzes, and more. Whatever your project, from a textbook to a family album, this workshop will help you make the most of what iBooks Author has to offer.

Topics include:

  • Your first iBook in just four minutes
  • Creating covers and introductions
  • Importing and formatting text
  • Adding and adjusting images
  • Creating custom layouts
  • Inserting tables, charts, and galleries
  • Adding audio and video
  • Creating a table of contents or glossary
  • Previewing and publishing your iBook.

View this entire Up and Running with iBooks Author course and more in the lynda.com library.

December 2nd, 2013 - Posted in Events, Resources by Anna

Are you currently working or newly hired in one of CLRC’s member libraries? Here is an upcoming opportunity to receive New York State certification as an Library Assistant or Technician.

The New York Library Association (NYLA), in cooperation with public library systems around the state, is sponsoring a three-week, non-credit, program in January. To receive certification, individuals must complete the entire 18 hour program.

Introduction (Day 1, morning)
An introduction to libraries and library service. Open to individuals already working or newly hired in libraries, or people interested in working in libraries. Discussion topics include the history of libraries, the foundational principles of library service, the major types of libraries, the different functional areas of library work, the various jobs and roles in library work, an overview of the current employment landscape in the library field, and a discussion of “hot topics” such as censorship, privacy, rights of access, and social media.

Reference Services (Day 1, afternoon)
This component of the training program is an introduction to reference and information services in libraries. Topics include the organization of information, the reference question, and search strategies. Electronic reference products, trends in reference work, types of reference materials, and library/bibliographic instruction/information literacy, are discussed. The role of the library assistant in this aspect of library service is explored.

Public Services (Day 2)
An introduction to public services in libraries. This section covers access policies and procedures, collection management, customer service, and public relations.

Technical Services (Day 3)
An introduction to technical services in libraries. This section covers technical services policies and procedures, also technical components of general utility across the library.

Upcoming classes:

Mid-Hudson Library System
Poughkeepsie, NY

Tuesday, January 7 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Tuesday, January 14 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Tuesday, January 21 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Upper Hudson Library System
Albany, NY

Wednesday, January 8 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Wednesday, January 15 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Wednesday, January 22 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

The cost for the program is $215 for NYLA Members and $255 for non-members.
All materials and lunch each day are included in the registration fee.

REGISTER HERE

November 25th, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

In this series on productivity, lynda.com contributor and author Jess Stratton takes you through the latest tools that will help you run your business and life more efficiently. (more…)

November 25th, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

CLRC offers its member constituents (including members of our five participating library systems and indivdual members) access to the entire lynda.com training library at no charge. For more information on how to request an access code, please click here.

When it’s done right, mentoring helps people take positive steps forward in their careers—which also helps develop the talent pool in an organization. In this short course, author Todd Dewett shows you simple steps to become a mentor who works with others to achieve more in their professional lives. He explains the difference between coaching and mentoring, and provides simple techniques for becoming an effective mentor. Learn how to agree on a mentoring schedule and goals, ask smart questions, provide straightforward advice, and more.

View this entire Designing a Resume course and more in the lynda.com library.

November 24th, 2013 - Posted in News, Programming Ideas by Claire

Maxwell’s youth services librarian Rose Burdick has just completed a program that makes Summer Reading seem like a walk in the park! Camillus Con, the first-ever anime and science fiction fan gathering in Camillus, spearheaded by teen library volunteers, was held Saturday, July 27.

Bree Argiro and Anissa Croft, seniors at West Genesee High School, thought volunteering at a local library would be a good way to fulfill their senior year service requirements. The two girls spent a few weeks learning their way around the library, shelving books, and assisting where needed. Then Burdick had the great idea of asking her teen volunteers to come up with an idea for a new project.

Zach Osborne as troll cop Sollux Captor from Homestuck

Zach Osborne as troll cop Sollux Captor from Homestuck

Anissa and Bree often attend conventions (“cons”), such as Tora-Con in Rochester, NY and knew this would be a perfect project for Camillus teens.

A fan gathering is a convention for people who are interested in various “fandoms”— anime, webcomix, card games such as Magic, TV shows such as Dr. Who and Sherlock, movies such as The Avengers—to come together for a day of discussion, contests, shopping, and just plain fun.

CamCon2 IMG_1352 Ezra McKeon as the 11th doctor from Doctor Who

Ezra McKeon as the 11th doctor from Dr. Who

As a student in middle school, Anissa discovered the graphic novel section in the school library. She was fascinated by the art form but didn’t know anyone who shared her interest. Fan networks and conventions such as Tora-Con helped her find many kindred spirits.

“So many kids think they’re alone, that there’s no one here for them,” said Croft during the planning stages of the con. “A gathering like the one planned at Maxwell will let them connect with so many others. It’s a good way for them to find their own little community.”

From the start, the Maxwell teens did most of the work for Camillus Con. An invitation via Facebook brought 20 volunteers to an organizational meeting in April. They designed a logo, sent out fliers, spread the word through social media, invited vendors, and educated the library staff about fandoms, cosplay, and Tumblr. As word of Camillus Con spread through local print media, school newsletters, Facebook and Tumblr pages, and community signage, registration grew. The greatest jump happened immediately after a television interview on Bridge Street, a local news magazine on Syracuse’s ABC-television affiliate, four days before the event.

CamCon1 Camillus Con interview on Bridge Street 07232013 Caroline Gable, Anissa Croft, Lizzy Croft, Chris Brandolino, Bree Argiro

Anissa, Lizzy, and Bree tell all of Syracuse about Camillus Con. Shown with Bridge St. anchors Caroline Gable and Chris Brandolino; photo courtesy of NewsChannel 9/WSYR-TV

Argiro, Croft, and the rest of the core group of planners were not without more established help. Youth services librarian Burdick and library director Katy Benson provided organizational expertise and agreed to close the library for a day to give attendees a safe place to gather. Skaneateles Library and the Camillus Town Shop lent sound equipment, and the Camillus First United Methodist Church was a second venue for panels and vendors. New York State Senator John A. DeFrancisco secured a grant for Burdick that covered equipment and food purchases and speaker fees.

Senator DeFrancisco, a noted friend to Onondaga County libraries, toured Camillus Con with aide Lindsay Bednarczyk. He was clearly impressed by the scope of the teens’ endeavor and commended them on their vision and hard work. While not familiar with all the shows and comics represented at the con, he promised to try to catch up. When told that Supernatural would be a good choice, although “a bit scary,” DeFrancisco quipped, “So is politics!”

CamCon10 IMG_1383 Rose Burdick, Senator DeFrancisco, Lizzy Croft, Anissa Croft

Maxwell youth services librarian Rose Burdick, Senator John A. DeFrancisco, Lizzy Croft, and Anissa Croft enjoy a Magic panel discussion

Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St., in the village of Camillus. For more information, call (315) 672-3661, visit online at www.maxwellmemoriallibrary.org, or drop by the library. Become a fan of Maxwell on Facebook to see upcoming events and library news and more. Go to the website to see the calendar of upcoming events and register for events.

 

- Press release from August 1st, 2013, by Rena Brower of Maxwell Memorial Library

November 21st, 2013 - Posted in Advocacy, Events, Resources by Deirdre

As of October 10, ImpactSurvey is now available in beta test mode for public libraries who may want to use this engagement tool to ask your community directly about the technology services they use and need. Specifically, ImpactSurvey asks patrons about how they use library technology services like public computers, wireless networks, online resources, and digital literacy training, and helps gather information about how to improve those services to enable better patron outcomes.

The survey has the potential to be a great tool to use as you prepare to talk to your legislators about your local library’s importance with the people that put them into office (advocacy opportunities for the CLRC region abound in December, January, and February).  

Jump on the opportunity to use this tool for free until July 2014.  After that date, a nominal fee will be charged for some services in order to maintain the site.

WebJunction hosted a webinar on the tool in September, the recording of which is now available for you to access here.  During this class, participants learned how library staff could implement the ImpactSurvey and use the survey results to:

  • Evaluate their library’s technological services;
  • Advocate for increased technology services and resources;
  • Generate reports, charts and graphs that can be shared to increased community support.

Is your library using ImpactSurvey? Tell us more in the comments section below!

November 21st, 2013 - Posted in News, Resources by Anna

Central New York libraries are helping children succeed.

young-student-and-student-tutor

A $5,000 grant from the New York Newspapers Foundation was awarded to Utica Public Library to help in continuing their successful tutoring program.

For the past five years, the library has provided elementary and middle school tutoring, using retired and current Utica City School District teachers. The grant will support approximately 220 hours of free literacy tutoring.

The New York Newspapers Foundation provides grants for programs designed to improve reading literacy. For more information, contact Diane Kennedy, assistant Secretary-Treasurer, New York Newspapers Foundation, 291 Hudson Avenue, Suite A, Albany, N.Y. 12210 or call 518-449-1667.

Read more from the Observer Dispatch.

November 21st, 2013 - Posted in Resources by Anna

A recording of Basic Library Law for Trustees, a webinar presented by the NY State Library, is now available at http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/webinars/index.html.

The webinar was co-sponsored by the NYSL and the Library Trustees Association of New York State, and presented by Jerry Nichols, editor of the Handbook for Public Library Trustees of New York State and Director of the Palmer Institute for Public Library Organization and Management at Long Island University.

Mr. Nichols introduces public library trustees to the critical laws and regulations that govern their library. Topics included the legal structure of libraries; the By-Laws and other critical documents; conduct of meetings and FOIL; policy fundamentals; trustee liability; and legal resources for trustees.

With the many libraries in the CLRC region and the many trustees associated with those libraries, this recording is an excellent resource to keep you on track.

November 21st, 2013 - Posted in DHP, Resources by Deirdre

The New York State Archives is presenting three great LGRMIF Grants Webinars See below for details and instructions on how to register. The first is for those contemplating submitting a proposal for a DEMONSTRATION project, the second for those considering a SHARED SERVICES proposal and the third is for anyone considering an INDIVIDUAL grant application.

CLRC public and school libraries, we’re talking to you!
 
 

How to Write a Successful LGRMIF Demonstration Grant Application

December 5, 2013.

10:00am – 11:00am (Login begins at 9:30am)

The New York State Archives has also introduced a new grant type for the 2014-15 grants cycle: Demonstration Grants.

The goal of the LGRMIF demonstration grants initiative is to fund projects that address electronic records management issues and produce results, best practices, and models that can be replicated, are scalable, or can be used more broadly in other governments or groups of governments of all types and sizes. Applicants are eligible for up to $100,000 for a planning demonstration grant and $500,000 for an implementation planning grant.

This webinar will provide potential applicants with an overview of the application process and explain the requirements applicant must meet to write a successful demonstration grant.
 
 

How to Write a Successful LGRMIF Shared Services Grant Application

December 10, 2013

10:00am – 11:00am (Login begins at 9:30)

Shared services grants provide funding for two or more local governments to cooperate on a grants project that will develop a permanent cooperative arrangement to solve a shared records management problem. This year the State Archives is dedicating 35% of all available funds for shared services grants. Applicants are eligible for up to $150,000.

This webinar will provide participants with an overview of the application process and the requirements applicants must meet to write a successful shared services grant.
 
 

How to Write a Successful LGRMIF Grant Application

January 7, 2014

10:00am – 11:00am (Login begins at 9:30)

This webinar is designed for those writing an individual type grant. This webinar will provide an overview of the application process and tips on writing a successful LGRMIF grant.
 
 
To Register for any of these workshops, please visit the workshop section of the State Archives website at http://www.archives.nysed.gov/a/workshops/index.shtml
 
 
Note: More information on the LGRMIF program can be obtained from the Regional Advisory Officer for your area.

In Herkimer, Oneida, and Onondaga Counties, please contact:

R. Kent Stuetz 
Regional Advisory Officer
Region 5-Central New York-Utica (Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego Counties)
Region 7-Rochester Area (Cayuga, Seneca and Wayne Counties)
Utica State Office Building
207 Genesee Street, Room 404
Utica, NY 13501
Phone: (315) 542-5909
e-mail: kstuetz@mail.nysed.gov

 

In Madison County, please contact:

Suzanne Etherington 
Regional Advisory Officer
Region 6-Southern Tier-Binghamton (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Delaware, Madison, Otsego, Schuyler, Tioga, Tompkins Counties)
Region 7-Rochester Area (Steuben and Yates Counties)
Binghamton State Office Building
4 Hawley Street, 16th Floor
Binghamton, NY 13901-4406
Phone: (607) 721-8428
FAX: (607) 721-8431
e-mail: setherin@mail.nysed.gov

November 20th, 2013 - Posted in Events, News, Resources by Deirdre

Anyone who has been listening to their local public radio station during these last few weeks may have caught the series that the Innovation Trail project has been doing on refugees and their contributions to Central New York cities.  

A few weeks ago, the focus was Utica and the important role that the refugee community has played there in revitalizing and rebuilding that city. Of course, librarians have long recognized the potential of these communities and have traditionally played an important role in reaching out to new immigrants (either as refugees or more traditional immigrants).  

To this end, librarians have developed lots of resources and practices, many of which can be accessed here through ALA’s “ilovelibraries” project.  

In Syracuse, OCPL’s White Branch has long been engaged in efforts to reach out to their immigrant community. How are you engaging immigrants in your libraries?  Tell us in the comments section below!

Think about tapping into this webinar series being offered by IMLS.  


 

New Federal Webinar Series Explores Immigration Resources for Public Librarians

The first webinar is December 12, 2013

Washington, DC—The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced the first in a series of four free webinars for public libraries about immigration and U.S. citizenship issues. The webinar series was developed as part of a broader effort through a federal partnership between IMLS and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to ensure that librarians have the necessary tools and knowledge to refer their patrons to accurate and reliable sources of information on immigration-related topics.

The first webinar, entitled Immigration and Naturalization 101, will take place December 12 from 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. EST.

The webinar will include a question-and-answer session and will cover

  • basic immigration procedures and benefits,
  • the role librarians can serve, and
  • new online resources for librarians on the USCIS website.

Presenters include

  • Susan Hildreth, IMLS Director;
  • Rachel Ellis, Branch Chief of Customer Access Branch in the Public Engagement Division, USCIS; and
  • Haleh Holly Taghavi, Management and Program Analyst in the Public Engagement Division, USCIS.

To participate, go to this Blackboard Collaborative Meeting Room at the time of the webinar. You may listen using your computer’s speakers, or dial 1-866-299-7945 and when prompted, enter the passcode 7434925#.

To sign up for updates about upcoming webinars and additional immigration and citizenship resources, register your email address at the USCIS website here.

The series will comprise four quarterly webinars in all, covering such immigration topics as the naturalization process and test, the unauthorized practice of immigration law, and USCIS systems such as E-Verify and the USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS).

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services 
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

November 14th, 2013 - Posted in News, Resources by Debby

The State Library recently distributed a Regents Advisory Council on Libraries (RAC) eResources survey via NYLINE lists on November 4. The State Library has asked for our help in getting this online survey out to as many of our member libraries as possible. In particular, the State Library needs help in reaching the directors of special libraries, since there is no separate NYLINE list for this group.

Please feel free to disseminate this survey to your lists and encourage your colleagues to complete the survey, if they have not already done so.

The survey may be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BGGSH3F

This online survey will be open through Wednesday, December 4, 2013.

The more information RAC can collect with regard to the cost of eResources, the better prepared the RAC Working Group will be to take positive action in implementing Recommendation #57 from Creating the Future: A 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Services in New York State.

Questions or problems? Please contact: Elise Harms, Division of Library Development, New York State Library at eharms@mail.nysed.gov .

Thanks so much in advance for your help!

November 12th, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

CLRC offers its member constituents (including members of our five participating library systems and indivdual members) access to the entire lynda.com training library at no charge. For more information on how to request an access code, please click here.

Resumes are critical to landing the right job and while the contents are important, how you design the resume itself can have a large impact. In this course, Steve Harris shows three different approaches to make your resume stand out. First, tour a clean, modern design that makes deliberate use of whitespace and simple color. Then explore a traditional resume that uses more stately color and fonts and allows you to add a little more detail to your job history. Finally, take a look at a design that incorporates bright colors, bold fonts, and rounded corners. Along the way, learn smart strategies for organizing your content, such as using bullets to keep your reader’s eyes moving and placing your most impressive qualifications up front and center.

Note: Steve uses Adobe InDesign to create these resumes, but we’ve included a bonus chapter that shows you how to recreate the same designs in Microsoft Word or the software of your choice.

Topics include:

  • Understanding general resume layout and design principles
  • Setting up InDesign for resume designs
  • Building the layouts
  • Styling the text
  • Introducing color
  • Outputting your resume to PDF

View this entire Designing a Resume course and more in the lynda.com library.

November 11th, 2013 - Posted in lynda.com, Resources by Deirdre

In this series on productivity, lynda.com contributor and author Jess Stratton takes you through the latest tools that will help you run your business and life more efficiently. (more…)