Regional Bibliographic Data Bases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing Program (RBDB)

The application process for 2016 awards will begin in November, 2015.

Reports for 2014 awards are due on June 30th, 2015.

These informal documents should include the amount spent, activities under the auspices of the grant, and an overall evaluation of the program.


The Regional Bibliographic Databases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing (RBDB) Program is a State funded program that improves access to library and information resources for library users through the regional development and coordination of automated library services. Under a Five-Year Regional Automation Plan, state funds are administered to do the following:

  • Coordinate and improve access to electronic information services and resources
  • Improve electronic access to library holdings in the regional database
  • Provide opportunities for area library staff to improve expertise in using information technology
  • Improve and expand electronically accessible holdings
  • Improve speed, efficiency, and equity of regional resource sharing

RDBD program funds are used to support regional programs and projects such as NY Heritage, WorldCat Discovery Services access, and training.

CLRC uses a portion of its RBDB funds for small grants to member libraries. The grants are awarded through a competitive application process for projects that meet the above criteria and have broad regional appeal. CLRC awards grants in three areas: Digitization, Metadata, and Retrospective Conversion.

Moon Library, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: $10,500 for the project, Conversion/Digitization and Preservation of William Harlow’s Film Work. The collection was created by an illustrious SUNY-ESF professor and will have broad appeal.

Fayetteville Free Library: $2,000 for the project Fayetteville Historic Newspaper Archive. The project will digitize reels of Fayetteville NY historic newspapers which are held in microfilm, and make them accessible electronically.

Dunham Public Library: $2,750 for Whitesboro Central School Yearbook Digitization. The project will digitize the library’s collection of yearbooks and add them to New York Heritage.

Cazenovia Public Library: $1,115 for the Cazenovia Oral History project. The library will digitize oral histories recorded by former town historian Peg Ladd in the 1980s, as well as their accompanying time indexes.

Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary: $3,000 for the project Retrospective Conversion of Core Russian Orthodox Collection.  The library will continue to convert cataloging for its highly unique collections to machine-readable form so the collections are visible in OCLC’s WorldCat.

Utica School of Commerce: $1,376 for a records upgrade. Current cataloging records for the library’s collection will be upgraded to MARC format and added to WorldCat, making it possible for the library to share its materials via interlibrary loan.

OCM BOCES School Library System: $10,000 for the Syracuse Dioceses Schools Resource Sharing Initiative. The project will help the region’s dioceses schools enhance their MARC records and create a shared catalog. The catalog will be accessible to students from home and will include e-content not previously available to these schools.

Upstate Health Sciences Library: $7,055 for Upstate Digital Historical Collections Cleanup. The project will increase access to historical materials by consolidating metadata for all scanned materials in one centralized database.

Manlius Library: $570 for Digital Oak Leaves. The project will digitize Fayetteville-Manlius High School yearbooks that are currently held by the Manlius Historical Society, and add them to N Y Heritage.

All of these projects will enhance resource sharing within the region and beyond, as they will make unique materials both discoverable and accessible to a broad audience. Congratulations to all of the 2015 RBDB awardees! The application process for 2016 awards will begin in November, 2015.

Moon Library, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: $6,500 for the project, Conversion of Time-Lapse and Forestry-Related Celluloid Film to Digital Files. The collection was created by an illustrious SUNY-ESF professor and will have broad appeal.

Onondaga County Public Library: $5,000 for the project CHAP 2014, Cataloging History give Access to the Public. The project will create quality cataloging records for rare or unique materials that currently have minimal cataloging in Onondaga County libraries.

Liverpool Public Library: $2,000 for Enhancing Metadata to Include New York Heritage Topic Terms. The project will bring Liverpool’s collections in line with current NY Heritage specifications.

Bird Library, Syracuse University: $8,000 for the project Arrangement and Description of the Forest J. Ackerman Collection.  Ackerman was considered the “Guru of Sci-Fi Fandom”. 200 linear feet of this collection remain untouched and this project will make them accessible.

Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary: $5,000 for the project Retrospective Conversion of Core Russian Orthodox Collection.  The library will continue to convert cataloging for its highly unique collections to machine-readable form so the collections are visible in OCLC’s WorldCat.

Mid-York Library System: $4,000 for Digitized Training for Staff and Patrons. This project will digitize already-created training materials and make them accessible to new audiences, as well as allowing delivery via mobile devices.

Moon Library, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: for the project, Digitizing the Fletcher Steele Collection.  This project will digitize and share the popular Fletcher Steele landscape architecture collection.

Onondaga County Public Library: for the project CHAP 2013, Cataloging History give Access to the Public. The project will create quality cataloging records for rare or unique materials that currently have minimal cataloging in Onondaga County libraries.

Fayetteville Free Library: for the Fayetteville Historic Newspaper Digitization Project. The library will digitize microfilm reels for Fayetteville newspapers published between 1841 and 1923, and make these freely accessible to the public.

Bird Library, Syracuse University: for the project Arrangement and Description of the William Hobart Royce Honore de Balzac Manuscript Collection.  The library will arrange and describe 24 linear feet of archival material related to Balzac.

Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary: for the project Retrospective Conversion of Core Russian Orthodox Collection.  The library will continue to convert cataloging for its highly unique collections to machine-readable form so the collections are visible in OCLC’s WorldCat.

Guidelines

CLRC follows the guidelines issued by the New York State Library for RBDB grants. Click here to learn more.

Questions

Questions about RBDB? Email Debby Emerson (demerson@clrc.org)